No Hard Feelings Queer relationship blossoms in this tactful story of migrant identification from first-time manager Faraz Shariat.

No Hard Feelings Queer relationship blossoms in this tactful story of migrant identification from first-time manager Faraz Shariat.

“I am the long term,” Parvis (Benjamin Radjaipour) mutters to himself within the darkness of their bed room, a vow for his very own sanity as a new homosexual German-Iranian guy. No Hard Feelings, Parvis confronts the direction of his future and the duplexity of his own identity against the backdrop of Germany’s refugee programme in Faraz Shariat’s debut feature.

Parvis’ nonchalant life of Grindr hookups and hazy homosexual club raves is interrupted whenever he’s caught stealing and provided community solution during the refugee shelter that is local. On their day that is first as translator, Parvis is kept overrun plus in rips. Handsome Amon (Eidin Jalali) approaches, extending hand of relationship that Parvis grabs. Amon’s vivacious cousin Banafshe (Banafshe Hourmazdi) completes a trio whoever relationship comes immediately, each coping with their particular plight that is personal.

For Bana, it is her deportation purchase; for Amon, it is their intimate orientation; and for Parvis, it is a disconnect to their cultural identification.

Shariat’s digital digital camera glides through neon-lit events before arriving at a halt that is stuttering Parvis bends over and empties his stomach on a road part. Amon and Bana are by their part keeping the wig that is blonde their face; in this tiny city, the brother-sister duo is their lifeline. As his or her connection deepens therefore do feelings between Amon and Parvis. It really is Amon whom makes the move that is first tilting on the tub to tenderly kiss Parvis. Continue reading No Hard Feelings Queer relationship blossoms in this tactful story of migrant identification from first-time manager Faraz Shariat.